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5 Tips to Draft an Impressive Resume

Paper resumes gave way to online applications in the last decade. The new trend settling in this decade is to create your own resume website. One thing remains constant throughout the years in all forms of job applications – resume. You are free to adopt any method of job application as long as you are equipped with an impressive resume. Here are the 5 tips to draft an impressive resume and use it to present hard copy or add it to the resume website.

1) Use titles and sub headings 
Organize the content under suitable titles. It is important to sort data and club relevant information under one heading. This helps to present a well structured resume that makes it easy for the reader to find out required information. Also, it breaks the monotony of reading vital chunks of information in one go. 
For example: Common titles used in resume are career objective, work summary, experience details, educational qualifications, achievements, personal details, references etc

2) Professional Format 
Whether you send a hard or soft copy, make sure the resume is designed professionally. Use white for background and black for the wordings. Using Times New Roman, Calibri or Arial of 12 font size is considered ideal for resume writing. Most resumes should be limited to 2 pages to keep the interest of the recruiter intact. However, executive resumes can go up to 3 pages. Do not use any pictures within the resume. Those planning for a resume website are allowed to be creative and use pictures or colorful backgrounds as long as it is professional.

3) Keywords Usage 
Using keywords is essential to make your resume noticeable. Most recruiters adopt the practice of searching candidates based on the certain keywords. The computerized systems select only those profiles that contain the buzzwords. Hence, make sure the words are well placed within the objective and responsibilities segments.

For example: The buzzwords for an accounting profile would be accountant, bookkeeper, accounts receivable, accounts payable, benefits specialist, and payroll specialist

4) Quantified Terms + Action Words 
Quantify your achievements to give an exact idea of the work performed to the recruiters. Instead of putting a generic description, mention the actual quantities of work performed. Make use of action words to present the facts. Common examples are implemented, improved, practiced, formatted, devised, trained, conducted, etc.

For example: One may say… ‘Improved the quarterly sale turnover significantly’. A better form of expression would be to say…. ‘Implemented policies that increased the quarterly sales turnover by 10% from the past quarter’.

5) Targeted Resume 
Update your resume every few days and add details of the advancements of your career to the resume. Tweak the resume contents to match the job requirements. Drafting a resume relevant to the recruiter’s expectations will certainly improve your job prospects. You can alter your career objective and role as per the requirements. Tweaking a resume is about emphasizing certain details of your career more prominently than rest of the information. It does not include providing false information.

For example: As per the recruiter’s requirement, you can name your profile as customer service executive, customer attendant, client coordinator, retail management officer, etc to describe your profile.

We hope these resume tips help you draft an impressive resume. Read Jenny on resume website and top resume website

Be Original With Your Resume, But Not Too Original

One of the most misunderstood concepts and hardest to answer questions is “What is a resume?” All too often people include a lot of useless and sometimes harmful information when they develop their resumes.

 

A good resume is made up of one or two parts that summarize your career objectives, your experience as a professional, and what you have achieved along with your education.

The top of the resume is called the heading and should contain your name, address and contact information. The body of the resume should contain the following sections:

1. career objective

2. profile/summary

3. professional experience

4. achievements

5. references

The career objective should be brief. It should be no more than two sentences and it should inform your prospective employers how you believe you can benefit their organization.

The summary should be short and informative. It should let the prospective employer know how you believe your skills could fit in with the job for which you are applying.

Be careful with the information you provide in the summary. It should not contain information that is not directly related to your career. The summary should not be long. It should be short and to the point. It should be just a few well-chosen sentences to show what you can offer to the job and to the organization.

Use the summary to attract the employer’s attention but don’t get too creative. Be professional and conservative.

When you list your experience, you should provide information about one to five previous jobs. If possible, focus on those features that apply to the position at hand. You should begin with the most current and list them in chronological order. Be sure to lite the dates you worked, the names of the companies and the persons your have worked for. List your titles and responsibilities and emphasize those duties that apply to the job you are seeking.

When you list your education list your college, graduate and post-graduate work as well as any special licenses or certifications that you have acquired. Also. list any achievements or special recognition that you have received or earned.

References should be listed. It is best not to make a statement such as “references are available on request.”.

A good resume will make you stand out from the crowd Make sure there are no spelling errors or grammar mistakes and that the formatting is correct..

Actually, no one really asks “What is a good resume” More people should ask “What is not a good resume?”

 

Dale H. Robinson has the opportunity to review resumes on a regular basis. He has seen the good, the bad and the terrible. More have been bad and terrible than those that were good. His blog, http://www.goodobjectiveforaresume.com will help you increase your chances of getting hired.

Mastering The Job Search Process

In the last decade, job seeking has changed and competition for every role is more competitive than ever. The prosperous decade of the 1990s, when jobs were plentiful and money (not to mention credit) was seemingly free flowing, failed to give way to an equally prosperous 2000s. Individuals seeking employment in this market are finding it difficult to do so, mostly because jobs have disappeared, having been shipped overseas or completely phased out. (Does anyone remember the door to door salesmen selling encyclopedia sets!) Job seekers are finding that they must be more strategic then ever in their search for employment.

Preparing the job search strategy

In order to succeed you need to have an understanding of what it takes to stand out in this tough job market. Those that fail to adequately prepare a job seeking strategy will likely find themselves without a job for the foreseeable future. Job seekers must learn to utilize their personal and social networks, professionalize their resume and develop great interview skills. Each of the aforementioned will greatly improve an individual’s chances of landing a job.

Networking

Networking is a strategy that many job seekers don’t focus on enough but in today’s society should be the number one strategy at the top of the list. The fact is, many workers can trace their current employment to someone who was kind enough to give them a job lead, a foot in the door or point them in the right direction. Today, networking has become easier then the ever, thanks, in a large part to the growth of online networking websites.

Social networking websites such as LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook are great places to meet people who share similar interests or who work in the same industry. However, even with the power and reach of social networking websites, a person may want to start their job search using the contacts they’ve developed in their own, personal network. Speak to your family and friends and make them aware that you are job hunting. Don’t be scared to reach out to people who are in a position to help.

Professional Resume Writing

Having a strong resume is a vital part of the job search process. With unemployment on the rise, the competition for jobs is as fierce as ever. Human resource professionals routinely receive hundreds (sometimes thousands!) of resumes for each and every job opening. In order to even be considered for a job, an individual’s resume must stand out from the pile. If it fails to impress in the first few seconds, the chances of being called in for interview is greatly reduced. Without a professionally written resume that highlights an individual’s skills, experience and achievements the chances of actually getting the job becomes an impossibility and only leads to further despair and stress. 
If you are not having the success you desire from your existing resume consider having your resume professionally written or edited. The cost of a resume writing specialist is far less than the cost of not having a job.

Interview Skills

Having great interview skills is extremely important and gives you the opportunity to shine in person. Actually receiving an interview request is often the hardest part of the job search, therefore make sure you are well prepared for the job interview. Research the company and practice answering potential interview questions. The more information you have on the company the more prepared you will be to answer any tough questions that come your way. The best way to becoming a master interviewee is practice!

Staying Positive

In today’s tough job market, job seekers should be prepared for a lengthy job search. However, being strategic about your job search can help you remain confident and upbeat during this period. Positivity is important so make sure you surround yourself with positive people. The last thing you need is negativity in your life.

RedStarResume are the Resume Writing Experts. They offer a resume writing service that is unmatched in its professional attitude and quality of service. RedStarResume have helped thousands of job seekers meet and achieve their career goals through delivering specialist resume writing that seeks the attention of hiring managers and ensures that you stand out from the crowd.

© RedStarResume Publications – http://www.redstarresume.com/

Avoid These Job Hunting Mistakes

Job Hunting is a difficult, stressful experience for anyone. Unsurprisingly, many people approach job hunting incorrectly and end up with an unsatisfactory job, or no job at all. Here are some key mistakes to avoid when looking for a job.

 

Waiting for something good to happen. While it is not unheard of for a job to just fall into someone’s lap, that is certainly not the norm. Successful people make their own opportunities. A related mistake is to rely on friends, family and other contacts will find you a job. While you absolutely should use your personal network of contacts in any job search, relying on someone else to do all of the work for you will lead you nowhere. Be proactive and do your own job hunting.

Applying for too few jobs. Particularly in today’s economy, most applications will not lead to an interview, and most interviews will not result in a successful hiring. As the old saying goes, do not put all of your eggs in one basket. People who apply to just a few jobs find themselves crushed when those few applications do not result in offers. Having plenty of possible opportunities increases the odds that one will work out and takes away much of the sting of rejection.

Aiming too low or too high. Many people approach job hunting with a pessimistic mindset. These people apply for jobs that are far below their abilities and qualifications. These people may get jobs, but they are unhappy with their pay and responsibilities. On the other hand, some people approach job hunting with an overly optimistic outlook. These people apply for jobs that are out of reach, and wind up feeling the sting of rejection. Maintain a realistic outlook with regard to your needs and qualifications.

Approaching interviews the wrong way. Preparation and attitude are the keys to a successful interview. People who do not rehearse their answers to difficult questions lose out to people who do. In particular, most interviews include an open-ended question such as “tell me about yourself.” Not having a prepared answer for such a question dooms many interviewees. Likewise, many interviewees approach an interview with a negative attitude, especially if they are still angry at a former employer. No matter their qualifications, people with negative attitudes spend a long time looking for their next job.

Taking the first offer, no matter what. A job is more than just a source of income; it is one of the focal points of a person’s life. Accepting an offer is a major decision and should not be taken lightly. Take some time to think about the offer and decide whether the job is really a good fit.

 

Lexi Davis is a writer who enjoys writing on a number of different verticals. For more on employment mistakes, Six Figure Start offers readers information more on common basic mistakes of the job hunt.

You, Inc.: Creating Integrated Career Positioning Messages

 Navigating the unpredictable economic winds and stormy job search seas, today’s executive and professional career explorer must don the appropriate foul weather gear, plot out a meticulous course, shore up his resources and set sail for what may be a longer-than-expected journey.

 While charting a course and preparing with all of the necessary equipment are imperative, being flexible and adaptable to shifting winds and alternate ports of entry are equally important. This is why creating and implementing a multiplicity of career positioning messages (ports in the storm, if you will), articulating your value and compelling readers to want to know more about you, is vital.

 A rigorous, often intellectually daunting exercise, strategizing your unique value drivers is an introspective process; you mustn’t downplay the importance of taking time, and thought, to do it right.

 Now, with your value messages prepared, I suggest there are six key off- and online career positioning ports that you populate with the painstakingly prepared messages, as follows:

 1. Presentation Resume: The heartbeat of your executive or professional story, this pithy, content- and design-driven document should be created initially in a Microsoft Word format. Focus first on melding together a congruent complexity of career anecdotes that zero in on the “why” and the “how” you do what you do in a way that tells your target reader (hiring decision maker) that you can create the same return-on-investment for them!

 Then, use the career unearthing and clarification process to populate several online venues.

2. LinkedIn Profile: The LinkedIn profile is not a mini-me resume; however, the shiny gems you dug up to create your resume will serve the LinkedIn story well, beginning with the creation of a first-person narrative Summary. This chronicle is an opportunity to uniquely weave in colorful threads of your passion for skyrocketing business growth, driving technology improvements, directing customer service enhancement initiatives, steering cultural change … and more.

Punctuate the summary with solid, concrete and measurable results while also infusing it with personality. This is only the tip of the LinkedIn profile iceberg. The Experience section as well as the Skills, Education and other areas offer further opportunities to fuel a message through a well-known, 100-million+ member business-networking site.

3. Twitter: I cannot deny it: Twitter is my favorite social media venue. With a brief, 160-character profile opportunity, I’d suggest you whittle down your value message to the most optimal insights.

Then, start listening to your Tweet stream, following movers and shakers — not necessarily the most popular and Klout-ranked tweeters, but those who are active and influential in a way that interests YOU and your goals. Whom would you like to meet? … to get to know better? Watch what they say; show interest in their messages; retweet them and add sincere, complimentary and value-add comments to their messages. Engage.

4. Google+: So much has been written already about this new microblogging platform including its value in boosting your Google search results. While I’m still exploring its value, I immediately saw the benefit in developing a meaningful storyboard profile: https://gplus.to/ValueIntoWords. I suggest the same for you. Then, start listening, and strategically posting valuable content and insights.

5. Facebook: The drumbeat of Facebook’s importance in the job search equation is getting louder. Most recently, an article in SmartBrief quoted one recruiter as saying that “… recruiters are increasingly using Facebook to find candidates. Potential candidates need to acknowledge this new branding of the self that social media generates and adapt their profiles to the new reality.”

6. about.me: Corral the above links into a central website repository by creating an about.me profile, as I did here: http://about.me/JacquiBarrettPoindexter. It also is crucial to include a tasteful, focused career value proposition, a summary that is consistent with your other profiles, mentioned above. Share the about.me link with networking 

Jacqui Barrett-Poindexter is chief career writer and partner with CareerTrend.net. Collaborating with professionals in transition, or individuals who desire to ignite existing careers, Jacqui is one of 27 Master Resume Writers globally and holds a BA in writing. She can be found blogging at the CareerTrend blog, or Tweeting at @ValueIntoWords.

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4 Tips to Look Younger on Your Resume

Because of the illegal yet persistent practice of age discrimination in hiring, many seasoned job seekers want to appear younger on their resumes. The impulse is understandable, but many prospective employees go about resume editing in ways that are ineffective and make their resumes look as if they are attempting to hide something from prospective employers.

 

As a job seeker, if you do wish to look younger on your resume, here are some ways how:

1. Set up a Gmail Account – Email domains that were popular a decade ago is a sign (regardless of reality) that a job seeker is not up to date on current technological trends.

Not that Gmail is a newfangled addition to the email rolls, but nearly every young job seeker that sends their resume to our office uses the Google e-mail platform.

2. The Titles of Your 1st and 2nd Job – Many older job seekers who wish to appear younger truncate some of their first jobs on their resumes, yet still give away their experience range by having the first listed title be some form of managerial or senior level position.

When more seasoned job seekers end up doing so, it seems as if they may be hiding something such as their age or even past experience. This could translate into looking insecure to the resume reader.

3. Knowledge of Technology and Social Media – Many experienced job seekers are failing to keep up with new technological and social media / marketing trends. Since the demand for hiring companies to have individuals who can implement things such as blogs, website updates and working on iOS or Mac computers, job seekers who know these things look younger on paper, and more intelligent than those who simply know Windows and MS Office (an expected minimum).

Therefore, if you don’t know Mac operating systems and blog content management systems such as WordPress, not only do you look older, you are simply not as competitive as those who do, regardless of experience level. Unfortunately, you might also look lazy: the Mac OS is notoriously user-friendly.

4. Stating Number of Years In Your Resume Objective – Many job seekers who wish to look younger fall short in their resume objective by putting the number of years of experience that they have regardless if they implement a “+” sign.

This means that putting phrases like “Experienced marketing professional with 15+ years of retail marketing experience seeks job in,” is only going to make the resume reader wonder the exact value of “+” on your CV.

In the end, age discrimination in hiring is as commonplace as it is illegal. Write off the discriminatory parties as a bad working environment anyway, and focus on the fact that any hiring party worth their salt will be looking at knowledge, qualifications, and compensation level. Communicate these clearly and predominantly enough, and the resume reader will entirely forget to read into your age range.

 

Ken Sundheim is the Founder and President of KAS Placement Marketing Headhunters Chicago Executive Recruiters a sales and marketing staffing agency that helps both U.S. and International firms recruit all levels of sales and marketing experts throughout the U.S. and Canada.

The staffing professionals at KAS Media Headhunter Media Recruiting Firms have been around since 2005.

Executive Job Hunting? You’ll Need More Than a Resume

If you're an executive planning your next career move, it might intrigue you to learn that you'll be judged by more than just your resume during your job search.

In other words, a full resume is most likely not going to be the only source of information that recruiters use to decide if you are the right person to be interviewed.

Surprised? You'll find that recruiters, company owners, Boards of Directors, and other hiring decision-makers often look at your experience through a series of interviews and investigations— which means that your executive resume is just one part of the process.

Not only should you consider which audience is looking at your portfolio, but also the steps required (initial screening, in-depth interviews, panel reviews, Board interviews) in the hiring process, before assuming that your resume is the best fit for each situation.

Here are 4 must-have documents for an executive portfolio designed to capture attention at all the right levels—, along with recommendations for the timing of each component:

1 – Executive Biography.

A short, narrative-form document, the Biography often appeals to readers that are not engaged in the technical detail of a full resume.

In addition to being shorter than a full resume, the bio can also be infused with more personality, and can therefore give the reader a different perspective on your leadership traits, beliefs, and principles.

The best readers for an Executive Biography are usually networking contacts or Boards of Directors. This means that the bio will be most useful either early in your job search, or in the later stages of your executive interviews.

As an example, you'll probably encounter networking contacts who may be messengers, rather than hiring decision-makers. This group is easily overwhelmed by a full resume, and can be much more receptive to the single-page Executive Biography.

Later, after you've passed initial stages of your executive interviews, your full resume will have been already examined by hiring authorities. This is the perfect time to bring your Executive Biography as a leave-behind document for an interview with the Board.

2 – LinkedIn Profile.

While not technically a "document" created just for job hunting, your LinkedIn Profile is a critical— and often under-utilized— piece of an executive portfolio.

Most executives set up a Profile very quickly and then abandon it, becoming preoccupied with their work. In executive job hunting, however, this is a costly mistake!

Your LinkedIn Profile may very well be the first piece of information encountered by a corporate recruiter or independent headhunter. Therefore, it must be polished, professional, and keyword-heavy (the latter of which aids others in finding you through LinkedIn's internal search engine).

While your full resume can be attached within LinkedIn, it's best to have populated each of the site's main sections (Headline, Summary, Specialties, Experience, Education) with sufficient information to convey your executive brand and trigger a recruiter's interest.

3 – Cover Letter.

Despite the myth that hiring authorities rarely read cover letters, some audiences (company owners, CEOs, and Presidents) might not even glance at your resume until they've fully digested the contents of your letter.

These groups are usually probing for specific leadership and communications abilities that they feel are more evident within the letter. Investors, in particular, like to read a very short, bottom-line value proposition letter, in lieu of a resume.

In short, don't write off a cover letter as an important document in the hiring process, as you might find that it was this part of your portfolio that influenced an interviewing decision.

4 – Full Resume.

Not a month goes by when a social media or recruiting expert poses the question, "Is the resume dead?"

Not to worry – the need for a resume won't go away soon. You'll absolutely be asked to send your resume to many contacts at different stages of your search.

Of course, since your executive resume is technically the centerpiece of your presentation, it must therefore convince employers of your brand, value proposition, and leadership standing— – No small feat!

To create such a powerful document, you'll need to get up to speed on resume trends. Formats and presentation styles have changed considerably: a full executive resume should encapsulate your strategic contributions, along with metrics, testimonials, success stories, and leadership competencies, all inside a masterpiece.

Often, the best readers of a full resume will those that thrive on analytical detail (such as operations or technology executives that hire EVP and Director-level candidates).

In summary, an executive portfolio is a must for serious job hunters ready to assume a leadership role. The days of distributing an executive resume without backup in the form of a Executive Biography, LinkedIn Profile, or Cover letter are gone!

Your job search will be smoother, faster, and more effective with a well-rounded, branded portfolio that appeals to the diverse audiences you'll encounter.

 

About the author

Laura Smith-Proulx is an award-winning Executive Resume Writer, former recruiter, and multicredentialed expert with a 98% success rate opening doors to prestigious jobs through personal branding. The Executive Director of An Expert Resume, she partners exclusively with CIO, CTO, COO, CEO, CFO, SVP, VP, and Director candidates.

New Resume Tips For Older Workers

Are You An Older Worker Who Needs A New Resume Idea?

 

Lots of older job seekers are getting very frustrated. As unemployment has spiked, older workers got hit really hard. Some of them have been out of work for several months. Some have been out of work for years. Many complain that they cannot even get their foot in the door to speak to a hiring manager.

Is this all age discrimination, or is some of it based upon the fact that an old resume template can date an older worker? Most of us in the over 50 age group learned to write our resumes decades ago. The format and employer expectations have changed during that time. While we may have done a good job learning new skills and developing our own business experience, we may not have checked up on the latest resume formats!

Resume Ideas For Over 50 Workers

Get some quick tips here. It may pay off to start here, and then do more research on your own. You may even want to invest in a professional resume service if it has been a long time since you have had to hunt for a job. I cannot claim that this is a comprehensive guide to writing a resume.

Forget the 1 page rule. If you have decades of valuable experience and a large skill set, you may need to add more pages. Do not write a novel, but favor adding a second page instead of reducing your one page wonder to a tiny font. or leaving out some key points.

One size does not fit all! In the old days, we could produce one resume, copy it, and send it out to dozens of employers. These days, it pays to modify a resume to highlight the skills and experience that will help you get a particular job. This advice also applies to your cover letter.

What can you do for me? We used to have a statement of our goals in the heading of our resumes. We might say something about our vision of a perfect job. Employers, these days, are more interested in their vision of a perfect employee. You can research the company, and decide if you want to work for the employer. But please replace this personal goals statement with a statement about how you are a good fit for the job you want to get!

Do some trimming. If you are looking for a high technology job, your new employer may not be interested in your FORTRAN or COBOL skills from the 1980s. Of course, if the employer has legacy systems to support, this may be a big interest to them. This goes back to the point about developing unique resumes for each job you want to apply for. You may leave out some older skills, or just add a line about having “legacy” skills you could discuss in an interview. The important thing will be to focus on the skills and experience that the employer asks for on the job request so you can get that first interview.

 

Are You An Older Worker Who Needs A new Job?

Get some tips on developing an older workers resume that can give you a new start! Get more advice at Over 50 Jobs.

How To Write an Executive Resume – 3 Critical Elements You Must Include

With so many executive candidates on the market today, you need to do an amazing and unique job at selling yourself as the only solution to your prospective employer. To accomplish this, you need to craft an executive resume that gets results the first time and sets you apart from the competition. This article will outline three critical elements when asking how to write an executive resume.

 

For your executive job search, you need to remember that you are a product for sale and the employer or company hiring is the customer with a substantial need to fill at the executive level. When crafting your executive resume, be sure to follow these three elements:

1.) Demonstrate You Can Exceed Their Needs. An organization hiring at the executive level has a critical need the Board of Directors must fulfill and it’s important to understand that time is of the essence. The longer a period of time the position remains empty, the more risk the organization or company has. Using this information to your advantage, ensure that your executive resume is crafted specifically to perfectly fit the existing and future needs of the company you’re interviewing. Let them know you are able to meet and exceed their company goals.

2.) Demonstrate Professional Value. In business, generally speaking, you can offer the least expensive product or a product or service with the best value. It is not feasible to offer both. The same holds true when investing in people at the executive level and when discussing compensation. These organizations will purchase the least expensive office supplies, but you can be sure they will invest properly in business executives to carry the organization to the next level.

To further demonstrate your professional value, be sure to highlight your past successes in your career history. Always use hard and quantifiable numbers to build your story which can include sales numbers, revenue growth, cost reductions, or milestones met or exceeded. Such quantifiable data will help build your worth in your executive resume and give you maximum impact to get the job.

3.) Positively Stun Your Prospect. Even at the executive level, employment recruiters and Human Resources departments review countless resumes and give just a second to each unless there are elements that help stand you out from the crowd. If you don’t include formatting and text that catches the reader, you may find yourself in the dreaded trash pile.

Use the current needs of the company to add some examples and language into both your executive resume and cover letter so that the reader will be able to relate better. You’ll want to really understand the goals of the company you’re interviewing for so you can properly tailor your writing to meet their needs. You can use certain visual text elements including bold and italics, but use sparingly so you don’t distract the reader.

 

Jessica Peloski is an executive for a major National Corporation and writes articles on how to write an executive resume. For more information, please visit http://www.ExecutiveResumeSecrets.com/how-to-write-an-executive-resume

Give Your Resume a Youthful Makeover

Despite the desirability of experience as a “wish list item” on any hiring manager’s checklist, job seekers, especially those over forty, often fear losing out to their younger competitors. Notwithstanding protection from anti-discrimination laws, a few creative strategies can transform your resume into a powerful document that not only showcases your hard-earned experience, but also downplays the age factor (“A-Factor”).

As a career coach and professional resume writer, I work with thousands of accomplished professionals and executives, some with over three decades of experience. Though not appropriate in all cases, here are some strategies I have used to de-age resumes without compromising experience:

Take years off your resume

Experience is certainly a prized positioning strategy, especially for senior-level candidates, but that doesn’t mean one should go all the way back to the 60’s. In my opinion, fifteen years of recent employment chronology is sufficient to market a professional’s background.

In unique situations where a job seeker’s background – and the position’s requirements – merits detailing older positions, consider creating an “additional experience” section without dates. Eliminating dates can be very useful for the education summary as well, especially if your bachelor’s degree was obtained in or prior to the 80’s.

Highlight your work with younger markets, technologies, or products

If you recently worked on a marketing campaign targeting Generation Z or contributed toward the development of a cutting-edge product, mention it at the beginning of your resume. A summary section may be the most appropriate place to highlight this experience. For technology workers, start your professional proficiencies section with technologies, systems, processes, and strategies that are truly cutting-edge.

Expertise in state-of-the-art technologies can give you a solid competitive boost, especially if your profession is constantly evolving.

Emphasize your ability to connect with younger peers

Almost no executive can claim to have risen to the ranks without training Ms. Robinson, the intern, or Smith, the entry level professional and yet this information is almost never found on the resume. The ability to connect with younger professionals is an excellent indicator of a senior-level professional’s flexibility.

Stay abreast

Add a “Professional Development” section to your resume to identify your continuing education efforts. The section can send a strong message to recruiters that you are actively upgrading your skills.

Leverage social media

Add Web 2.0 tools, such as LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, and other social networking strategies to your job search arsenal. The advent of Web 2.0 and social media has impacted the job search landscape significantly. Recruiters and hiring managers often use these tools to find and evaluate candidates and a meaningful presence on the social media circuit can be an important contributor toward your job search success.

Nimish Thakkar is a sought-after certified career management coach and professional resume writer. Through his resume writing service, ResumeCorner.com, and free career information site, SaiCareers.com, he has helped thousands of clients. SaiCareers.com features hundreds of free articles and thousands of resources.

How to Tailor Your Resume for the Job You Are Applying For

Today’s seasoned professional possess a variety of skills and abilities that benefit the work environment. Corporate employees are expected to keep up with trends within their field of expertise. If you are fortunate your employer will pay for your education and training. As a result of increased duties and cross-training many job seekers realize they can fill jobs outside of the title and industry they have been working with for years.

Recently I coached an individual that was having difficulty returning to the workforce after being laid off 8 months ago from her job where she worked as a District Store Manager for a retail employer. Karen was 49 years old and had worked for over 20 years within the retail industry in some form of management capacity. She posted her resume on Monster and searched for jobs on Indeed but she only had one phone interview in the past 8 months. Her resume looked OK but when I asked her to provide more details in her job duty section it was revealed that she had performed many job duties that a corporate human resource generalist, recruiter and trainer does. She conducted interviews, provided training, negotiated and extended offers. She prepared and distributed payroll. She enjoyed these H.R. related duties so we prepared a 2nd resume that highlighted all of her H.R. related duties. The best place to highlight your specific skills related to the job that you are applying for is in your summary which should always be listed right beneath your name and contact information. Your summary of qualifications is a very critical component of your resume, without it your odds of being recognized are diminished significantly. It was in the summary that Karen listed how many years she had with preparing payroll, interviewing and training. She mentioned what kind of payroll software she worked with, what type of interviewing techniques she used and the size of her audience that she trained. In the summary specifics sell. Karen reposted her revised resume on Monster, created a LinkedIn account and applied to human resource related jobs via Indeed.com, within one week she had three interviews for human resource jobs! Within two weeks of posting her new resume she accepted an offer with a major retailer to work within their human resources department. The offer paid more than she ever earned as a District Manager and an added bonus her exhausting road travel requirements were eliminated. In Karen’s case she enhanced her human resources duties but applied to H.R. jobs within the retail field where she had many years experience.

One of the keys to tailoring your resume for a specific job is know which skills you have that are of value to the position/client. One of my human resource friends, Cindy, has a general version of her resume and a resume that she uses when she applies for jobs that require a recruiter that has experience finding Information Technology professionals. As a corporate recruiter consultant she has interviewed and on-boarded professionals for Sales and Marketing, Healthcare, Wireless and Information Technology positions of employment. When she applies for an information technology recruiter position Cindy minimizes her background that involves recruiting Sales, Marketing, Healthcare and Wireless professionals and expands on her I.T. recruiter experience. For her latest I.T. Recruiter resume she wrote a list of what are the most common questions she is asked in an interview setting when applying to an I.T. Recruiter position. Upon reviewing her list she was able to answer many of the interview questions in listing those skills first and foremost in her resume summary section. Cindy put in bold the areas she wanted the recruiter or hiring manager to be drawn to when reviewing her resume. If there is something that is very important for the reader to see she will print it in bold red lettering. She also looked carefully at the key words listed within the job descriptions that appeal to her and incorporated as many key words as possible in her resume summary and job description. To identify key words look for the specifics in the job description.

Below you will see Cindy’s general Recruiter resume followed by her Information Technology Recruiter resume:

Cindy Examplelcandidate 
Cindy’s contact information listed here… 
*successfully traveled to work on-site for duration of contracts as well as worked remotely

Summary: 5+ years agency experience, 10+years Corporate Contract Recruitment experience within a matrixed environment. Sr. Talent Acquisition Specialist with over fifteen years of full-life-cycle internal/external recruitment experience including developing and maintaining relationships with hiring managers to determining the best recruitment strategies. Serve as candidate advocate working to ensure a world-class experience for all potential candidates. Able to thrive in a high-pressured, ambiguous environment. Experienced with UltiPro, Vurv, Recruitmax, BrassRing, Prohire, Raycats, Peopleclick, PeopleSoft, SharePoint, Behavorial interviewing, Web 2.0 recruitment processes, Outlook & Lotus Notes. Managed vendor relationships. Articles published on corporate recruitment – Western International Media & e-zines.

Experienced sourcing and screening for the following: I.T., Sales, Marketing, Retail, Wireless, Healthcare, Government and Business professionals.

Work History **All assignments were completed successfully, on-time, within budget. 
1999 – Present EXCELLENT Incorporation Company 
Principal – Corporate Contract Recruiter 
Aka: Talent Acquisition Consultant

CLIENTS:

IBM 
As Recruitment Program Manager am responsible for managing exempt-level I.T. high-volume candidate activity. Serve as front end to hiring partners. Qualify candidates, facilitate the interview process, work closely with hiring executives to evaluate candidates and prepare offers. Also provide direction to dedicated sourcers for fulfillment of opening requisitions. 
September, 2010 – present

Press Ganey/South Bend, IN 
Responsible for staffing I.T., Legal, Sales & Marketing departments for this leader for Patient Satisfaction Surveys. Source and Screen legal, sales, marketing and I.T. professionals for positions located across the U.S.A. Coach managers on selection of hires. Prepare offers. Write and post job descriptions. Cold calling as well as utilizing major and niche job boards. Assist with the implementation of company ATS, Ultipro. 5/10/10 – 10/27/2010 and 9/14/09- 12/17/09

IMS -( I.T. Staffing Agency)/Huntington Beach, CA 
Assist this agency with staffing for: Architect, Management, Project Leader, Programmer Analyst, DBA, Developer, Systems Analyst, Software Engineer, Business Analyst, and other I.T. related roles. Skills recruiter for: Citrix, SharePoint, SQL, LAN/WAN, DHCP, Lotus Notes Administrator, helpdesk, C#,.NET, IBM, Intel, migration, VB, Oracle DBA, MCSE, CCIE, PowerBuilder, XAML, WinForm, TCP/IP, C+, HIPAA, Scrum, Agile, Q.A. Analyst/Tester, MCP, J2EE, JDE and others. Extensive Cold- calling

Clients: Entertainment, Commercial, Automotive, Healthcare 1992 – (on/off support)

T-Mobile USA/Cerritos, CA & Novi, MI 
Source and screen for retail division. Roles responsible for filling include: Sales Engineer, Account Development Representative, Event Rep., and Technical Sales Support. Positions are spread across the country. Partner with hiring managers to council on selection of candidates as well as construction of offers. ATS: Vurv 3/5/07 – 8/26/07 and 8/8/08 – 1/5/09

AT&T Mobility/Los Angeles, CA 
Source and screen wireless sales professionals for the government division. Interact with H.R. Hiring Managers and Applicants across the country. ATS: Peopleclick Offer process: Peoplesoft Corporate community site for sharing information: Sharepoint

Assist hiring managers with newly developed recruitment process due to AT&T acquisition of Cingular Wireless. Create and conduct phone screens. Review resumes in ATS and make recommendations to hiring managers. Prepare and extend offers to candidates. Company was in M&A mode with U.S. Cellular 
“It is evident that Kelly has a passion for recruiting, and a confidence in her skills. This shows in the way that she approaches the recruiting challenges that are presented to her.

I highly recommend Cindy for any recruiting position she will pursue in the future. She has been a very valuable resource on my team.” Charlotte P – Associate Director Mobility Staffing 10/07 – 7/08

Humana /Louisville, KY 
Using ATS, RecruitMax (Vurv), job boards, internet, and referrals sourced a variety of healthcare insurance professionals for exempt and non-exempt level positions of employment. Consult with hiring managers to determine specifications for role. Develop phone screens to determine interview eligibility. Interview applicants face-to-face. Consult with hiring managers for selection of candidates to extend offers to. Negotiate salaries for and with candidates.

Extend offers verbally and in writing. Assist with mass hiring campaigns for various Humana locations throughout the United States. Utilize basic HTML coding. 
Was key contributor for two week hiring initiative of 20+ Frontline Leaders (Supervisors). This initiative required the sourcing of 200+ resumes, phone screening 40+ candidates, coordinating with hiring managers to interview and on-board new employees within two weeks all at the same time providing candidates and extending offers for other hiring departments.

“Cindy is an expert in the Staffing/Recruiting Industry. She has a wealth of knowledge and is an out-of -the-box thinker. She delivered results in a challenging and tough environment, while carrying a heavy workload of requisitions. I received numerous compliments from hiring managers on the quality of candidates presented and responsiveness.” Larry M – Staffing Manager at Humana 10/05 – 2/07

HRFirst/American Express/Troy, MI 
Using BrassRing, job boards and the internet was responsible for sourcing & screening various marketing professionals for sites across the United States. 8/05 – 10/05

Berbee Information Networks/Southfield, MI 
Hired to develop talent pipeline and place networking and sales professionals for Berbee’s enterprise software industry clients. Berbee provides end-to-end sales and services for IBM, Cisco & Microsoft business products. Utilize ATS: Prohire, job boards, employee referrals and networking to hire systems engineers, system architects, account managers, Network Voice

Engineers, and other I.T. professionals. Developed phone screens from questions asked of hiring managers and top level I.T. professionals within industry. Negotiate offers, consult on recommended starting sign-on bonuses, relocation and vacation packages. Check professional references. Sell candidates on the value proposition of joining the Berbee team. 2/05 – 6/05

Raytheon/Troy, MI 
Hired for ten-week contract recruitment assignment for this Fortune 100 company. Raytheon Professional Services, LLC designs and executes integrated learning solutions for commercial, military and government organizations worldwide. Responsible for sourcing, screening and hiring web instructors, as well as hard-to-fill hybrid I.T. positions. Provide strategic recruitment methods. Create and conduct phone screens. Using Lotus Notes, set up interviews for multiple hiring managers. Utilized company ATS: RayCats. 11/04 – 2/05

Kaiser Permanente/San Jose, CA 
As project manager for community-wide nurse hiring event was responsible for contacting college instructors, cold-calling potential attendees, keeping administration and recruitment staff abreast of activities, maintaining spreadsheets for activity updates, and delegating responsibilities to various personnel. Overall duties involved hiring of nurses from start to finish, i.e., sourcing, screening, interviewing, set up interview with management, follow up with applicant and management, salary negotiations, offer letter preparation. Utilized internet effectively for recruitment purposes. As part of recruitment team was able to bring on board over 60 nurses, thus cutting nurse hiring needs in half. “I am continually amazed at your dedication and work ethic.” Sherry B, nurse management candidate, Kaiser email message. 8/04 – 11/04

Port Huron Hospital/Port Huron, MI 
For this six-month contract assignment was responsible for full-life-cycle recruitment of allied healthcare professionals for 1200 employee hospital. On average filled four positions per week. Utilized behavorial interviewing techniques. Developed recruitment strategies and advertisement campaigns to attract candidates for difficult to fill positions of employment, i.e.: respiratory therapists, pharmacists, MRI technicians, ultra sonographers and phlebotomists. Prepare offer letters, prepare and give presentations to management on how to recruit effectively, gave presentations regarding H.R. procedures at staff orientations, negotiate with vendors and prepare a host of H.R. related paperwork. Track Affirmative Action using Peopleclick software. “She has covered every aspect of what I need to know to keep the process (recruitment) moving. I truly appreciate all she did to fill our open positions” Marlene Z/Housekeeping Supervisor, email sent to H.R. department head at Port Huron Hospital. 
12/03 – 7/04

Additional Clients 
Clients: Deloitte & Touche, Hewlett-Packard (HP), Accenture, Carlson Marketing, Paramount Pictures, Giorgio’s, Universal Studios, Staffed senior level I.T. professionals.

EDUCATION 
B.A. with distinction in Speech Communication San Jose State University, San Jose, CA

MEMBERSHIPS 
SHRM – Society for Human Resource Management 
SMA – Staffing Management Association 
ERE – Electronic Recruiters Exchange

Volunteer 
Provide job-search workshops to various classes/groups/associations/government sponsored events 
Published articles on job search in newspapers, e-zines and magazines

**Following is Cindy’s I.T. Recruiter resume. You will notice that in addition to highlighting her I.T. recruiting activity in the first page of her resume she continues to highlight her I.T. related skills throughout the job duty descriptions and right up until the end of her resume where she list the additional clients that she has worked for. **

Cindy Examplecandidate 
Cindy’s contact information listed here… 
*successfully traveled to work on-site for duration of contracts as well as worked remotely

Summary: 
15+years Corporate Contract Recruitment experience within a matrixed environment. 
15 years full-life-cycle internal/external recruitment experience including developing and maintaining relationships with hiring managers to determining best recruitment strategies. Serve as candidate advocate working to ensure a world-class experience for all potential candidates. 
Able to thrive in a high-pressured, ambiguous environment. 
Experienced with UltiPro, Vurv, Recruitmax, BrassRing, Prohire, Raycats, Peopleclick, PeopleSoft, SharePoint

Experienced sourcing and screening for the following: 
20 yrs full-life-cycle recruitment for I.T. professionals for the following environments: Manufacturing, Wireless, Healthcare, Consulting, Retail 
On & Off 10 yrs engineer staffing: software, sales, network, VOIP, systems 
20yrs recruitment for exempt, non-exempt, enterprise software (ERP), SQL,.NET, Cisco, IBM, Microsoft infrastructure, engineer, architect, process improvement, business analyst, Business Intelligence, outsource operations, Six-Sigma Black-belts, Project Managers, others…

Tools and Sources used to locate quality I.T. professionals: 
• Company ATS 
• Linkedin (messages, invites, announcements via groups and associations) 
• Job boards: DICE, Monster, TheLadders, SixFigures, Executnet 
• Niche internet sites: Free-for-Recruiters, scguild.com, findadeveloper.com, ishunter.com 
• Web 2.0 sites: Twitter, Facebook, Zoominfo, Spoke 
• Utilize own income to join and participate in associations and conferences 
• Referrals, heavy networking, meet others when I give job search presentations in the community 
• Passionate about cold-calling

Work arrangement: Lifestyle flexible to where have travelled to work on-site for duration of contract as well as have worked successfully from home office as telecommuter.

Work History **All assignments were completed successfully, on-time, within budget. 
1999 – Present EXCELLENT Incorporation Company 
Principal – Corporate Contract Recruiter 
Aka: Talent Acquisition Consultant 
CLIENTS:

IBM 
As Recruitment Program Manager am responsible for managing exempt-level I.T. high-volume candidate activity. Serve as front end to hiring partners. Qualify candidates, facilitate the interview process, work closely with hiring executives to evaluate candidates and prepare offers. Also provide direction to dedicated sourcers for fulfillment of opening requisitions. Positions processed: Oracle developer, Oracle DBA, SAP Basis, SAP Architect, COBOL developer, Siebel developer 
September 16, 2010 – present

IMS -( I.T. Staffing Agency)/Huntington Beach, CA 
Assist this agency with staffing for: Architect, Management, Project Leader, Programmer Analyst, DBA, Developer, Systems Analyst, Software Engineer, Business Analyst, and other I.T. related roles. Skills recruiter for: Citrix, SharePoint, SQL, LAN/WAN, DHCP, Lotus Notes Administrator, helpdesk, C#,.NET, IBM, Intel, migration, VB, Oracle DBA, MCSE, CCIE, PowerBuilder, XAML, WinForm, TCP/IP, C+, HIPAA, Scrum, Agile, Q.A. Analyst/Tester, MCP, J2EE, Java, CISSP, JDE and others. Extensive Cold- calling 
Clients: Entertainment, Commercial, Automotive, Healthcare 1992 – (on/off support)

Press Ganey/South Bend, IN 
Responsible for staffing I.T., Legal, Sales & Marketing departments for this leader for Patient Satisfaction Surveys and performance improvement. Source and Screen legal, sales, marketing and I.T. professionals for positions located across the U.S.A. Coach managers on selection of hires. Prepare offers. Write and post job descriptions. Cold calling as well as utilizing major and niche job boards. Assist with the implementation of company ATS, Ultipro. 5/10/10 – 8/27/10 & 9/14/09- 12/17/09

T-Mobile USA/Cerritos, CA & Novi, MI 
Source and screen for retail division. Roles responsible for filling include: Sales Engineer, Account Development Representative, Event Rep., and Technical Sales Support. Positions are spread across the country. Partner with hiring managers to council on selection of candidates as well as construction of offers. ATS: Vurv 3/5/07 – 8/26/07 & 8/8/08 – 1/5/09

AT&T Mobility/Los Angeles, CA 
Source and screen wireless sales and technical sales professionals for the government division. Interact with H.R. Hiring Managers and Applicants across the country. ATS: Peopleclick Offer process: Peoplesoft Corporate community site for sharing information: Sharepoint 
Assist hiring managers with newly developed recruitment process due to AT&T acquisition of Cingular Wireless. Create and conduct phone screens. Review resumes in ATS and make recommendations to hiring managers. Prepare and extend offers to candidates. Company was in M&A mode with U.S. Cellular 
“It is evident that Kelly has a passion for recruiting, and a confidence in her skills. This shows in the way that she approaches the recruiting challenges that are presented to her.

I highly recommend Cindy for any recruiting position she will pursue in the future. She has been a very valuable resource on my team.” Charlotte P – Associate Director Mobility Staffing 10/07 – 7/08

Humana Inc/Louisville, KY 
Using ATS, RecruitMax (Vurv), job boards, internet, and referrals sourced a variety of healthcare insurance professionals for exempt and non-exempt level positions of employment. Consult with hiring managers to determine specifications for role. Develop phone screens to determine interview eligibility. Interview applicants face-to-face. Consult with hiring managers for selection of candidates to extend offers to. Negotiate salaries for and with candidates.

Extend offers verbally and in writing. Assist with mass hiring campaigns for various Humana locations throughout the United States. Utilize basic HTML coding.

Was key contributor for two week hiring initiative of 20+ Frontline Leaders (Supervisors). This initiative required the sourcing of 200+ resumes, phone screening 40+ candidates, coordinating with hiring managers to interview and on-board new employees within two weeks all at the same time providing candidates and extending offers for other hiring departments.

“Cindy is an expert in the Staffing/Recruiting Industry. She has a wealth of knowledge and is an out-of -the-box thinker. She delivered results in a challenging and tough environment, while carrying a heavy workload of requisitions. I received numerous compliments from hiring managers on the quality of candidates presented and responsiveness.” Larry M – Staffing Manager at Humana 10/05 – 2/07

HRFirst/American Express/Troy, MI 
Using BrassRing, job boards and the internet was responsible for sourcing & screening various marketing and I.T. professionals for sites across the United States. 8/05 – 10/05

Berbee Information Networks/Southfield, MI 
For this high-tech consulting company that provided end-to-end services for IBM, Cisco & Microsoft business products utilize ATS: Prohire, job boards, employee referrals and networking to hire systems engineers, system architects, account managers, Network Voice Engineers, and other I.T. professionals. Negotiate offers including sign-on bonuses, relocation and vacation packages. Sell candidates on the value proposition of joining the Berbee team. 2/05 – 6/05

Additional Clients that I served on a contract basis 
• Deloitte & Touche – I.T. professional placements – Greater Nashville area 
• Hewlett-Packard (HP) – I.T. professional placements – Metro Detroit area 
• Accenture – I.T. professional placements – Michigan 
• Raytheon – Marketing professionals – Michigan 
• Paramount Pictures – I.T. professional placements – Southern California 
• Universal Studios – I.T. professional placements – Southern California 
• Carlson Marketing – I.T. and Marketing professionals – Michigan 
• Girogio’s – I.T. professional placements – Southern California 
• Kaiser Permanente – RN’s for their hospitals in Bay area, CA

EDUCATION 
B.A. with distinction in Speech Communication San Jose State University, San Jose, CA

MEMBERSHIPS 
• SHRM – Society for Human Resource Management 
• SMA – Staffing Management Association 
• ERE – Electronic Recruiters Exchange 
• AHIMA – American Health Information Management Association 
• HIMSS – Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society

Volunteer 
Provide job-search workshops to various classes/groups/associations/government sponsored events 
Have been a guest on Cable TV show relating to the Job Search process 
Online video speaker for Newspaper web site 
Published articles on job search in newspapers, e-zines and magazines 
Author of book, The Recruiter’s Hiring Secrets

Create several versions of your resume and save them on your computer so you can easily upload the appropriate resume for the job you are applying for. Also remember to constantly be updating and refining your resume. Happy Job Hunting!

 

Kelly Smith is a Corporate Recruiter Consultant. Kelly works alongside human resources and hiring managers to source, screen, review resumes, interview, negotiate and extend offers to thousands of candidates throughout her more than 15 years in staffing. Visit Kelly’s web site at http://KellyStaffingExpert.com see her blog, view jobs, and visit her store to buy her book, The Recruiter’s Hiring Secrets. Also, in the store link you can send Kelly your resume for her to review and to make recommendations from her corporate recruiter perspective. Happy Job Hunting!

6 Resume Mistakes to Avoid at All Costs

It may be a horrible situation to be in, but being unemployed gives you the time to create the best resumes. But do you know what makes the best resume writing? Chances are, you’re making some big resume mistakes.

Most people overlook important details when they create a resume. Here are 6 resume mistakes that you need to avoid at all costs:

1. Not making your resume specific to the job you’re applying for

The best resumes are not one-size-fits-all. Every time you send out a resume, it has to be tailored to the position you’re applying for. For example, one job may want someone with managerial experience, while another posting highlights the need for budget experience. Give prospective employers what they’re looking for, and you will be much more likely to get a call back.

2. Copying and pasting your resume from Word to a text box

You could have come up with the best resume writing in the world, but once you copy it to a text box, it could all be ruined. Many times, copying and pasting destroys the spacing and turns your carefully-crafted resume into a sloppy mess.

If you absolutely have to copy and paste your resume into a text box, go through it very carefully, and make sure everything looks right – before you hit send.

3. Not proofreading

This is one of the biggest resume mistakes out there. You need a fresh set of eyes to go over your resume and look for any mistakes. The best resume writing is clear and concise; what you wrote might make sense to you, but does it make sense to a friend? Have someone else look over your resume for you. If there’s no one that can proofread it for you, at least let it sit for a few hours and go over it again. By coming back to it later, you may discover errors that you missed a few hours before.

4. Not focusing on what you bring to the table

This is another huge resume mistake. Don’t just list what you’ve accomplished. The best resumes turn accomplishments into benefits for a prospective employer. Potential employers want to see what you can do for them.

5. Not using keywords

The best resume writing gets your application to the top of the pile, and, nowadays, that means using certain trigger words. Most companies do not have the time or the manpower to read each resume with a fine-toothed comb. Instead, someone will scan them quickly, or they’ll use a computer program to scan resumes for them. That’s why you need specific keywords or ‘buzz words’. If your resume is being scanned by a computer, not including the right keywords will land your resume in the trash – without a human ever seeing it.

6. Making it easy to scan

Your resume needs bolded words and bullet points, so that it’s easy to skim through. If you write a novel, no one will take the time to read it.

 

Does your resume need work? If the stress of being unemployed is making it tough to create the best resume, FileUnemployment.com can help. Whether you need to file for unemployment, need help with your job search, or need information on unemployment benefits, FileUnemployment.com is your one-stop unemployment resource!