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Category Archives for Cover Letters

Signs You May Need a Headhunter

Tired of scanning job sites like Monster and Career Builder every day and finding nothing of interest? What about submitting your resume to dozens of employers and never getting a call back? If you feel as if you have exhausted your own occupational resources, you might need to try a new approach to the job hunt, or more specifically a headhunter. As recruiters for employment services, headhunters either work directly for companies or are hired by contract to help them find the best employees. It is these recruiters’ job to match the best candidate with the right job. Here are a few signs that one could benefit you.

You have a hard time selling yourself.

Sometimes other people are able to sell ourselves better than we can. It is often tricky to find the right balance between confidence and cockiness, especially when interviewers are picking you apart based on your skills and qualifications. In short, employers can’t always trust what you say about yourself but they might be more likely to trust what someone else says. Since headhunters are paid to find the right person, employers know that one wouldn’t be interested in a candidate unless they were confident about their abilities and potential to be a good employee. Think of a headhunter as your own personal salesman and the product as you, they are only going to try to sell that product to someone they believe will buy it. In other words, they will only put you up for jobs that they know you have a good chance at. Remember, hiring managers know that headhunters will only send them the best candidates, and their recommendation may be just the thing you need to get your foot in the door.

You don’t know where else to look for a job.

When you have exhausted all of your own contacts and connections and don’t know where else to look, you need to find someone who does. Headhunters are career experts and it is their job to know where there are vacancies that need to be filled. Companies have various ways of hiring new employees, most of which the average person probably never considers. When empty positions negatively affect productivity, they need to be filled as quickly as possible. Most hiring managers don’t have the time to post job ads and filter through hundreds of resumes, so they need someone who can weed out candidates for them. Many headhunters specialize in specific industries, meaning they have much better contacts and connections than you do and are often the first ones to hear about open positions. A headhunter’s solid job lead can help you get hired at a company you never would have known about otherwise.

You don’t have time to look for a job.

It’s been said that looking for a job is almost like a full-time job itself. If you are working in a part-time or temporary position to make ends meet, you probably don’t have a lot of spare time to devote to the job search. Headhunters can help lighten your load by looking for jobs when you can’t. Not only do they pinpoint appropriate positions, they spend their time contacting employers, distributing your resume, and talking to hiring managers directly. And while they are doing the work, it won’t cost you a thing. In the end you both win because when a headhunter is able to successfully place you in a position they get paid by the company that hires you.

This guest post is contributed by Kate Willson, who writes on the topics of best online colleges. She welcomes your comments at her email Id: [email protected]

Execute Fundamentals to Win in Today's Job Market

Legendary football coach Vince Lombardi used to say; “Fundamentals win it. Football is two things: It’s blocking and tackling. If you block and tackle better than the other team, you’re going to win. Execute the fundamentals and the rest will follow”.

There are three fundamentals in today’s challenging job market that need to be executed in order to win. They are:

Preparing thoroughly
Strengthening self-confidence
Networking consistently

Job seekers who execute these fundamentals will be successful in today’s job market.

What does it mean to prepare thoroughly? To be thoroughly prepared, you must be knowledgeable of the industry, company, job and the interviewer. A job seeker must research:

Industry trends
Current impact of the economy on the industry
History, problems, successes and outlook of the company
Company products
Competing companies
Company’s reputation in the industry
Job description and expectations
Interviewer’s background

Information on these subjects can be found in industry journals, company Web sites, annual reports, analyst reports, webcasts on company earnings, and by talking with company employees, competitors and customers. The information is available; it just takes a little work to get it. The investment in time and effort to review this information will pay huge dividends in the interview.

As one unknown author said, “The more you sweat in practice, the less you bleed in battle”.

Having gleaned information about the field, company, position and interviewer, a job candidate can begin to think of reasons why he or she is uniquely qualified for this position. Consider what skills, experiences and knowledge you have that will differentiate you from other job candidates.

Based on that assessment, the next step is to practice answers to interview questions:

Alone
With family and friends
Until you are convinced you are prepared

Once you believe in yourself, believe you are the best candidate for the position, then and only then are you thoroughly prepared for the interview.

Strengthening self-confidence is the second job market fundamental. A person’s self-confidence is rarely static in the job search process. Wide emotional swings are common place. Yet, an interviewer looks for job candidates that convey self-confidence.

What can you do to build your self-confidence muscle?

Nothing builds self-confidence more than thorough preparation. Doing the research and practicing your answers will build your self-confidence.
You also build self-confidence by:

Setting a goal
Developing a game plan
Modifying the game plan when necessary
Sticking to the overall game plan

For example, each year thousands of novice runners finish their first marathon: 26.2 miles. A year earlier, many of those same runners would not have believed they were capable of running anywhere near that distance. But they set a goal and followed a daily marathon training schedule. After 16 weeks of scheduled daily runs, they arrived at the finish line to claim their finisher medals.

If setting a goal and following a plan works for running 26 miles, it will work for winning in today’s job market. Setting a goal to acquire a job, developing a game plan with specific steps needed to accomplish that goal, and working that plan on a daily basis will help insure your self-confidence is ready to meet the job market challenge.

The third and final fundamental is to network consistently. On average, people change jobs more than 10 times and their careers 3-5 times over their lifetimes. Since we change jobs that often, it’s a good idea to know where we will find those jobs.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 70% of all jobs are found through networking. Staying in touch with friends, acquaintances, former employers and employees through phone calls, emails, and/or online social and business networks is a job market fundamental that should be practiced on a daily basis. The mantra for the third fundamental is: Network, network, and network!

Like football, winning in the job market requires focusing on fundamentals. And, to repeat the words of Vince Lombardi, “Fundamentals win it. Execute the fundamentals and the rest will follow”.

Writing A Cover Letter For Your Resume

The cover letter gives you the opportunity to be more personal than is appropriate in a resume. In your letter, show your enthusiasm for the job. Offer complimentary comments about your addressee’s company. (These compliments must be based in fact. Otherwise, they will make you seem ill informed or worse!) End with a direct request for a personal interview.

Sample cover letter

Mr. Fred Ward Tampa Builders 1131 Vista Drive Tampa, Florida 28804

Dear Fred:

It was a pleasure to speak with you last Wednesday. As we discussed, I am interested in being considered for the job of chief estimator with your firm. I am originally from Tampa, and would like to rejoin my family there.

In addition, I would like to participate in the upsurge of building now transforming the Tampa area. You mentioned that you are not from this region originally. If you had seen the sleepy, undeveloped backwater of my boyhood, you’d know just why I’m so excited by the growth Tampa is experiencing today.

Tampa Builders has been a positive force behind this growth, as I hope to become with my upcoming move. Tampa has several excellent contractors for me to consider, but I’ve taken a specific interest in your firm because of your success on the Vista Height Condominium development, and the fact that you do not yet have a computer-estimating department.

I am well versed in the use of MC2 estimating software, and I’d like to show you the cost advantage you could enjoy by implementing a similar program for Tampa Builder’s next projects.

I will be in Tampa next Tuesday and would like to visit with you during the day if your schedule allows. Please call me at your earliest convenience.

Again, Fred, it was a pleasure to speak with you.

Sincerely, Arthur T. Advancer

Senior Estimator ATA/ct

The article above was written by senior construction recruiter Frederick Hornberger, CPC, president of Hornberger Management Company in Wilmington, Delaware, construction recruiters providing construction recruitment and construction recruiting services on construction jobs. Visit us at http://www.hmc.com or http://www.constructionexecutive.com

Top 10 things for older job seekers to keep in mind

So you are looking for work but are worried that since you are a more mature employee that you might be discriminated against. Here I have 10 things you can do to help this from happening!

The good news: You have vast experience and many employers would be lucky to have you. The bad news: Due to your age and how you handle everything from writing a resume to what you talk about in an interview, you may encounter age discrimination.

Personally I prefer older workers as they are typically more mature, reliable and have vast experience that the team can draw upon, but many employers see older workers as stuck in their ways, unable to learn new software or hardware and not comfortable working for a younger manager.

Find out about culture. Employers know better than to address your age, but there is no reason you can’t ask your own questions about how you might fit in. (This ties in nicely with an office tour). Ask questions such as “I have worked in several organizations with diverse ages in each department – can I ask about diversity in this department/company/division?” If the manager is in fact several years younger than you are, you could address it by saying “I just interviewed with another company and we discussed how I might feel working for a younger boss and wanted to share with you that this is absolutely no problem…I did in fact report to a younger manager once and he too was concerned…(then proceed to tell him or her specific examples of projects you worked on where you had more experience than the manager and how it worked out well….) Also, ask for a tour of the office during your interview. I used to stress to all of my candidates to do this, but in your case it is very important. The reason is that you get a very clear sense of the type of people already employed – are they happy, seem disgruntled or are they all of the same age group or cultural background? Even the way the employees look (or don’t) look at you and smile will give you a hint as to how you would be received in the company culturally. My recommendation is to ask for a “quick office tour” at the end of your first interview. Look for a company with a good track record of diversity. This means exactly that – if a company is well known for hiring all new graduates, then the chances of gaining employment in such a company when you are older than those in the company may prove difficult.

If you have been a manager and the position you are interviewing for is not a manager’s position, write your resume in a functional style but leave out titles as much as possible. Better to say Project Management as opposed to V.P. Project Management. The idea is to get the employer to see how you can do the job rather than thinking about how you might not fit in.

Talk about the challenge of the position and how there would be things for you to learn in this position. The employer may fear that not only have you “been there done that” and not be open to doing things differently, but they may fear that you may quickly grow bored and leave. This is not to say to lie and say that something is a challenge when it isn’t, but think of a few things that you haven’t done and stress that in fact you would like to take a few years to learn the role and the company. You may even discuss that although you have significant experience in industry A, that having the opportunity to work within industry B would be a challenge because….The key here is learning and if you communicate that you are a “lifelong learner” and you are not afraid to learn new things, processes and ways of doing things, it will help the employer feel more comfortable in hiring you.

Be modern – typically what I have seen is that the older the interviewee, the more formal the attire – and sometimes this can be overkill. Dressing too formally can hurt your interview just as dressing too casually can. For example, leave your double-breasted suit at home and wear dress khakis, a dress shirt, a tie and a sports coat instead. Women should wear suits with pants or a skirt but not a dress. Yes, dress to impress but keeping mind the style and culture of the company and the job before deciding how formal. Also, are your glasses from the 70s and your hairstyle is the same one you have had for 20 years? Perhaps it is time for an update! There is no crime is being a mature job seeker, but the more you try to be modern, the better. Another thing I have noticed with more mature workers is that men typically use cologne and strong aftershave – please use a very light touch or don’t use them at all when interviewing as it is a distraction to the interviewer.

Keep up to date on software: If you are in fact out of date with some of the newer software programs or office machines, seek out help at your local college or community center. The more versed you are in the current programs, the better – and remember that employers rule out older workers often with questions about software that you can’t answer – don’t let this happen to you!Do some research by looking through job listings on company websites, job boards and in the paper and take note of the technical skills needed for the area of work you are targeting.

Do not put your birth-date on your resume or cover letter (or other personal information like marital status or Social Security # for that matter) – this was commonly done years ago but not only does this lead to potential identify theft but this information will advertise your age. A lot of employers could care less the age of their employees, but why not let the employer judge you on your experience and accomplishments as opposed to your age?

Only list a maximum of 15 years of employment history on your resume – reason for this is that prior to that, your experience may not be as relevant. If it happens that the employer asks about previous experience in an interview, keep it short and sweet and focus more on what you have done more recently. Information overload can happen when you bring out your entire history and the employer may have a hard time remembering what you said! Also, if your diploma or degree was earned more than 20 years ago, just delete the dates on your resume. Some people leave out listing experience beyond 15 years but leave the dates of their education – and this can lead to discrimination.

Try not to reminisce. One of the reasons you don’t want to go back to your early career on your resume or in the interview is that often employers will want to ask you all about the “good old days” at that mythic company and “are all the rumors true?” Believe me, I have seen employers bring candidates in just for kicks. Stick to talking about the company’s current needs and how you can help them fulfill these needs. Talk about similar projects and how you could do the same for them.

When negotiating salary when your past salaries have been higher (and you are open and able to earn less), keep in mind that just the fact that you have had a higher salary may be an issue. So when the conversation comes up about salary (bring it up in the first interview if you have had to fill out an application with past salary information) – best to try not to give them the exact salary you were earning before so as not to scare them if their range is less. You could say “As you know my past roles have been at a more senior level and my salary reflected that. However I am at a different stage in my career now and I am more interested in interesting work than climbing the corporate ladder. I am open to the mid to high end of your salary range and would be happy at that level.” If they insist on a specific number, remember that whatever number you give them you would be willing to accept as it is difficult for you to get an employer to change an offer once it is made.

Smaller companies are often more open to hiring older workers – for some reason this is a pretty universal truth, so take advantage. Research smaller companies in your area and approach the owners or managers directly – entrepreneurs and small business owners are more risk-taking than managers in large firms, so this would be a good place to start

Courtesty Examiner.com

What Color is Your Cover Letter? How to Write a Cover Letter That Gets You

What Color is Your Cover Letter?

Most letters that come across my desk, both at the University of Wisconsin Law School and in my business, are very standard, and rather boring. I equate the blandness of these letters to the color gray. And gray doesn’t stand out. It just blends into the background.

A Little Gray is Okay

I don’t expect a lot from the first two lines of a cover letter. That’s where you tell them what job you’re applying for, where you found out about it, and something very basic about you and your goals. But do say something about yourself by the third line in the first paragraph that will impress a recruiter or employer and make them want to read more!

I don’t expect a lot from the last paragraph. That’s where you tell them your resume is attached and that you look forward to discussing your qualifications for the position. No need to get creative there.

Time for a Paint Job

It’s the middle paragraph or two where “color” comes into play.

The grayed-out letters I tend to see look something like this:

“I have spent the last ten years gaining experience in X. At job A, I did B, where I gained experience in C. At job D, I did E, and gained experience doing F. At job G, I did H, and learned J. I therefore feel that I would be an asset to your company.”

I hope you agree with me that it’s time for a makeover!

Painting Your Passion

Stop blending into the background! The cover letter is your opportunity to paint yourself in bright, eye-catching colors – as someone who would bring personality and flair to a position, or true problem solving or negotiating skills, or, at the very least, some passion.

How do you do that? Tell a story that shows them who you are.

You might write about how you won the trust of a contract manager who had been ready to pull a contract from your company or organization. Or about how you successfully negotiated a conflict at work and obtained payment from a customer who was refusing to pay. Find a story from your work history and tell it.

These stories will catch an employer’s eye and paint a picture of a real person, with experience and attributes that reach beyond a list of resume bullets.

Take My Advice!

I’d like to share with you the following letter, which I received from a student at the University of Wisconsin:

I am ashamed to call the last documents I sent you “cover letters.” I wouldn’t have wanted to interview me. Sad. In these new cover letters, every sentence gives information that cannot be quite gathered from my resume. I really tried to pour some personality and passion into these and keep the reader’s attention. I can actually be proud of these letters.

This student says it well, and the results speak for themselves. This student got called for several interviews and will be working at a top law firm this summer.

Choose Your Colors

Give them new information, NOT a regurgitation of your resume. Pour in some personality (purple?), passion (red?) Throw in some anecdotes (green?) And you too will be able to say you are proud of your cover letters.

You’ll be a lot more likely to get that interview, where you really get to show them who you are.

http://www.TheEssayExpert.com For writing that gets results.

Brenda Bernstein, Founder and Senior Editor, [email protected]

If you are having trouble writing about yourself, contact The Essay Expert. Brenda is a Career Advisor at the University of Wisconsin Law School. She holds an English degree from Yale University and a law degree from NYU, and has ten years’ experience coaching individuals and companies on their writing projects.

Brenda’s expertise lies not just in creating an effective product, but in listening closely to her clients’ background and goals. Clients report that the tools they learn with Brenda allow them to undertake future writing projects with confidence and ease.

Specialties: Resumes, Cover Letters, College Application Essays, Professional Bios, LinkedIn Profiles

Steps That You May Complete As A New Employee

As a new employee you may have to complete several tests or screenings before you actually start working at your new career. As a new employee you should not be intimidated from the pre-employment steps. All of the pre-employment steps must be completed for several reasons and are only protocol.

3 Steps That You May Have To Complete

• As a new employee there is a good chance that your background history will be checked. Most employers perform a background check for confirmation that you have not committed any serious crimes. These screenings usually check driving records and check for any types of felonies or misdemeanors. The background screenings are simply used as a tool in order to protect the company and its employees from situations that could become problematic.

• You may have to complete a series of physical tests. If you are asked to complete any types of physical tests, this is to protect you and the employer. The employer does this so they will know that the new employee is able to meet the physical requirements for the new job. These tests protect the new employee because they may keep them from performing a task that they are not capable of safely completing. A drug test may also need to be completed before you are allowed to work in the new facility.

• There is a good possibility that you will have to complete safety training. Safety training is now a requirement for most companies. Safety training provides the new employee with the basic essential training needed for the job. Safety orientations for new employees will include basic company rules and processes that an individual must follow before entering the workplace. Safety training is used as a tool to reduce the amount of worker’s compensations cases within an industry.

Becoming a new employee always involves a variety of screening processes and procedures. A keynote to remember is to always be patient while performing the pre-employment activities that an employer may ask you to complete. Just know that after completing the required processes you will be able to perform your new job safely and efficiently.

Compare the top resume writing services all in one place. Choose the right one for you by visiting http://www.ResumeLines.com

Unique Tips For Helping Executive Recruiters Find Your Resume

With more people than ever vying for the same executive job opportunities, it’s important that you take every unique step possible to make sure that recruiters can find your resume among the many others out there. But how exactly can you get this done?

Here are some tips to make sure to help your resume stand out among the rest.

Make LinkedIn Your Friend

It’s hard to over-stress just how great a tool LinkedIn is for those who are pursuing opportunities in the professional realm. As an executive, it works well in a number of ways.

First, it allows you to connect with individuals within your professional networking online, which is always great. Then you can connect with individuals who are connected to their professional networks to create more opportunities for yourself.

Also, because the site allows you to garner and give recommendations, you can build up your references right on the site.

But what’s best for you in regards to helping recruiters find your page is the ability to build your resume and add links to any websites or blogs you have. By making yourself findable on this great site, you give yourself access to thousands of recruiters looking for the next great executive, so why not take advantage?

Build a Blog

Another great way to make yourself findable by recruiters, especially those in your field, is to create a blog that reflects your professional interests. Many bloggers draw in huge audiences by not only offering great advice for those interested in the topics the author is blogging about, but also by creating edgy and catchy topics that can stir up good discussions.

As a blogger, you can really focus on any aspect of the field you’d prefer. However, it’s good to keep two rules of thumb in mind while doing so. One, you want to make sure that you really know what you’re talking about when coming up with discussions so that follow-up in the comments section will be easy.

And two, it’s good to come up with ideas or topics of discussion that no one else is talking about. Of course, this can be pretty difficult with all of the topics that get discussed on the Internet. But even if you’re able to find a regular topic and put a new or funny spin on it, you will find that many readers will be excited about coming to your site for the reads they don’t get anywhere else.

Just Put Yourself Out There

Probably the most important aspect of making yourself findable by recruiters is taking advantage of the Internet as a whole, whether you’re using LinkedIn, creating your own blog (which are easily obtainable via email, by the way), or just making yourself easy to find on Google. The more you put yourself out there on the Internet, the greater your chances will be of getting found by recruiters.

Your best bet is to avoid taking the Internet for granted right now since so many recruiters make it their home. By sitting yourself in the center of the action, you’re bound to place yourself in the right place to find the next position of your dreams.

By Heather Eagar. Need a job? Be sure your resume is the best it can be. Review executive resume services and choose the best one for you and your situation. Do it today at http://www.ResumeLines.com

Unique Tips For Helping Executive Recruiters Find Your Resume

With more people than ever vying for the same executive job opportunities, it’s important that you take every unique step possible to make sure that recruiters can find your resume among the many others out there. But how exactly can you get this done?

Here are some tips to make sure to help your resume stand out among the rest.

Make LinkedIn Your Friend

It’s hard to over-stress just how great a tool LinkedIn is for those who are pursuing opportunities in the professional realm. As an executive, it works well in a number of ways.

First, it allows you to connect with individuals within your professional networking online, which is always great. Then you can connect with individuals who are connected to their professional networks to create more opportunities for yourself.

Also, because the site allows you to garner and give recommendations, you can build up your references right on the site.

But what’s best for you in regards to helping recruiters find your page is the ability to build your resume and add links to any websites or blogs you have. By making yourself findable on this great site, you give yourself access to thousands of recruiters looking for the next great executive, so why not take advantage?

Build a Blog

Another great way to make yourself findable by recruiters, especially those in your field, is to create a blog that reflects your professional interests. Many bloggers draw in huge audiences by not only offering great advice for those interested in the topics the author is blogging about, but also by creating edgy and catchy topics that can stir up good discussions.

As a blogger, you can really focus on any aspect of the field you’d prefer. However, it’s good to keep two rules of thumb in mind while doing so. One, you want to make sure that you really know what you’re talking about when coming up with discussions so that follow-up in the comments section will be easy.

And two, it’s good to come up with ideas or topics of discussion that no one else is talking about. Of course, this can be pretty difficult with all of the topics that get discussed on the Internet. But even if you’re able to find a regular topic and put a new or funny spin on it, you will find that many readers will be excited about coming to your site for the reads they don’t get anywhere else.

Just Put Yourself Out There

Probably the most important aspect of making yourself findable by recruiters is taking advantage of the Internet as a whole, whether you’re using LinkedIn, creating your own blog (which are easily obtainable via email, by the way), or just making yourself easy to find on Google. The more you put yourself out there on the Internet, the greater your chances will be of getting found by recruiters.

Your best bet is to avoid taking the Internet for granted right now since so many recruiters make it their home. By sitting yourself in the center of the action, you’re bound to place yourself in the right place to find the next position of your dreams.

By Heather Eagar. Need a job? Be sure your resume is the best it can be. Review executive resume services and choose the best one for you and your situation. Do it today at http://www.ResumeLines.com

3 Incredible Tips on How Write a Cover Letter For Your Resume

Cover letters are a dynamic way to introduce yourself to potential employers. Even before they look at your resume, you can give them a positive impression with a vibrant cover letter. Below you will find several tips to make your cover letter shine.

1) Introduce the Best Candidate: You!

A cover letter answers the question: “Why are you the right person for this job?” Before you write one word of your cover letter, imagine yourself as the best candidate for the opening. This will put you in the right frame of mind when choosing the words you want to represent you.

If you are punctual, hard-working, self-motivated, or have any other qualities your employer will want in his or her staff, the letter is the place to talk about it. Don’t be afraid to really sell yourself; a good letter distinguishes your application from the many others the company receives.

A cover letter does not answer the question: “What experience do I have?” Your resume does that. Instead of regurgitating your job history, use your letter to talk about what you will bring to the company if you are the successful candidate.

2) Do Your Homework

Not every employer is looking for the same set of skills. Therefore, one cover letter will not work for every application. To really “wow” your readers, treat every job opening as unique. Learn about the position you want and tailor your letter accordingly.

To really grab the attention of your reader, include evidence that you know a bit about the company for which you’re applying. If you’re applying for a job at a college, for example, check out their website to see if they’ve won any awards or if they have any notable programs. The hirers will be encouraged to give you a chance if your cover letter says something like, “I am impressed that your school has won the Huntley Academic Award, and I would be honored to join such an illustrious team.”

3) Advice on Formatting

To improve the readability of your letter, limit it to one page only, including your contact information at the top of the page. Make your cover letter very short, with concise paragraphs and plenty of white space left over. You don’t need to list every detail about yourself; just pick a few things that really stand out and showcase them only.

The font you use should be in a readable size (between 10 and 12 points), and should exactly match the font you choose for your resume. Use the same type of paper for both documents, as well. Your letter and resume will look most professional if you present them as a matching set.

Do not use multiple or complicated fonts, and avoid using colored paper or ink. A clean black typeface on stark white paper looks crisp, professional, and desirable to read.

Remember, the physical look of your cover letter is just as important as its content; each element reinforces the other, so take the time to make your letter look and sound just right. It might mean landing your dream job!

Brian Scott is a professional freelance writer who teaches how to write in Plain English using correct style and usage in the English language. He recommends using StyleWriter, an English Grammar Checker, to write better English, available at http://www.StyleWriter-USA.com.

Job Interview Mistakes You Can Easily Fix

A job interview is very important to your future career. An interview is the gateway to your new job. The employer is given a first and only impression of you with an interview so, it needs to count. A bad interview can cost you the job you have been dreaming about. Doing your research can help you avoid costly interview mistakes. You can stop yourself from making these common mistakes by following the tips below.

7 Mistakes You Can Avoid During Your Interview

1. What you don’t say can be as important as what you do say. Your non-verbal skills need to be as excellent as your verbal skills. Slouching in your chair can give a bad impression. If you are always looking at the ground while you are talking this is another mistake. Employers want to know you are confident in yourself. Make eye contact with your interviewer and sit up straight.

2. Dressing inappropriately is another common mistake. Many people go too casual with their apparel, which is a big mistake. This is your first impression, dress professionally to make it a good one.

3. Be sure to listen to the interviewer. What he or she has to say is just as important as what you are going to say. Employers will want to know you have good listening skills.

4. Not talking enough or talking too much are serious mistakes. You need to prepare your answers ahead of time to prevent this mistake. Talking too little can make it hard for the interviewer to really get to know you. If you talk too much it will seem like you are rambling.

5. Not asking questions is a mistake. Usually toward the end of the interview you will be asked if you have any questions. Chances are you will say no, but that is the wrong answer. Asking questions will show your interest in the company.

6. Begging, I feel like this is one of the biggest mistakes you can make. No one wants to hire someone that is overly desperate. It will also make your interviewer uncomfortable. Everyone needs a job but your qualifications should get you the job not your desperation.

7. Using inappropriate language during the interview. Using slang terms during the interview will make you look unprofessional. If you can’t be professional during an interview employers will think you can’t do your job professionally.

Need a job? Be sure your resume is the best it can be. Choose which resume writer works the best for you and your situation. Do it today at http://www.ResumeLines.com

Your Personal Branding & the Dilemma of Having 2 Job Targets

What do you do about personal branding when you have a well-developed personal brand in terms of your attributes and style but a muddy one in terms of your career brand? Because “what you do,” whether in a job, homemaking, volunteering, or self-employed, is a part of your personal brand, the problem often arises about how to handle your brand when you are in transition.

John Antonios makes important points in his post, “Personal Branding – A Full-time Lifetime Job!” about the need for authenticity in your personal brand (as opposed to being artificial or opportunistic). Also important is his statement that your personal brand can change and evolve as you do.

But, branding gets more complex when you are in job search mode and want to leave open the option of going in one of 2 different career directions.

Many managers and executives in technology – the folks I work with – have 2 career objectives. In terms of content for their resume and other marketing documents, their personal / career brand will change depending on the skills/experience/talents they want to be emphasizing for the particular job target. Your personal traits such as “inspirational,” “passionate,””never gives up” can and do usually remain constant, but the career identity will be different.

Say in one case the individual wants to present herself as a PMO expert and crack large program manager and in another as a VP of IT. She will need 2 sets of documents.

The tricky part comes when she has to present herself to her various audiences: LinkedIn, blog, Twitter, networking contacts etc. The ideal solution of course would be to do more career and market exploration until you have just one target. But, when that isn’t going to work, you need to frame the career part of the personal brand more broadly to encompass both areas: “IT executive with strong PMO and large program management credentials.”

When your goals greatly diverge, such as in the case of a serial entrepreneur who has worked in 3 different sectors, I recommend holding off on writing the LinkedIn Profile until your goal is clearer. It doesn’t make sense to represent yourself as someone who is a CEO, COO, Sales & Marketing VP, Business Development Executive, Director of IT, and Finance Manager, even though you have played all these roles. You get the picture.

Obviously, a brand is more powerful if there is a clear and logical progression in your career, but very often this is not the case. So your personal / career brand must be considered dynamically and handled in a context-dependent manner. Here’s where the attribute “good judgment” comes into play!

Article by Jean Cummings at YesResumes.com

Tips You Need To Know Before Changing Jobs

Changing jobs can be a very confusing and stressful time that every individual has gone through at some point in their life. Before changing employers, you want to prepare yourself to prevent any more stress than necessary.

Here are 3 Tips That Can Help You

• Before changing jobs, find out the real reason that you want to leave your old job. Remember, leaving your job should not be because of one bad day at the office. Remember that no job is perfect and that you will have bad days wherever you choose to work. A good task to perform is to think about the things you like and dislike about your current position. By looking at the positive and negative aspects of your current job, you will be able to weigh the good and bad. After weighing the pros and cons, you may decide to keep your current position or find a new job.

• Don’t forget to make a financial plan if you are thinking of leaving your current job and getting ready to try something new. By building a financial plan you will save yourself wasted time over stress when switching from one job to the next. Think about the obstacles that you may face while switching jobs, such as time between paychecks or even your current benefits. By looking at your current financial position, this will help you in setting your own criteria that you want your next job to offer.

• Respect your current employer while searching for a new job. If you hate the current position that you are in, remember that you don’t want to burn any bridges before switching jobs. This is one of the most common mistakes made before people switch positions. If your days are limited at your current job, you still need to make an effort to perform your daily job duties. Before switching jobs, always give your current employer notice so you don’t hang them out to dry. Just remember, what goes around comes around! You never know, you may need your old job back some day.

Respect and professionalism in the workplace is always important to remember regardless of how bad you want to leave your job and find a new one. If you plan on leaving, you must continue to show your co-workers and current employer respect and have a professional attitude.

How To Pick The Right Career

Picking the right career can seem oh so challenging. You’re probably thinking that there are so many career paths out there. How do I pick the one that suits me most? Some parts of the previous statement are true; certain careers may only fit a certain type of individual. With that said, careers are out there for everyone, the trick is finding a career path that fits your needs.

3 Tips That Can Help You

• Picking a career that suits your strengths is a must when seeking a job opportunity. Each person has a certain set of skills that they have developed throughout the course of their life. This is what makes each person a little different. When picking a career, don’t be afraid to take some time and make a list of what you think your strengths are as an individual. If you need some help from friends or co-workers, don’t hesitate to ask them. If you don’t choose a career that fits at least some of your current strengths, you could spend most of your time struggling to fit in or succeed. There is nothing wrong with developing a new skill set, but don’t set yourself up for failure.

• Finding a career that fits your personality will pay huge dividends. For example, if you are an outgoing individual who loves doing something different each day, you should not pick a career where you will be performing the same tasks on a daily basis. If your personality does not fit your career you will become bored and frustrated, which could lead to your unhappiness. Do yourself a favor and choose a profession that you enjoy and will want to make a career.

• Choose a career that has a progression path for you. If you have a self-progression path at work, this will give you some needed self-motivation on a bad day. When you can progress at work, you will stay on your toes, ready to perform the next task at hand. Looking forward to your next progression will not only help you develop your professional skills and push you to become a better employee, but doing so has proven to increase self confidence.

To pick the career that fits you the best, you may have to take some time to evaluate what you like and need. Don’t forget to think about the skill set you already have and where you see yourself in the future!

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